Hot Discovery in a Cool Nebula ​​​​​​​

 Left: Original Ha 21x1800s master image.                Right: Confirmation image by APizzetti, TLekatsas & CSasse.                                                                                       See the faint arcs above and below the main nebula, as well as the “central” thicker, more circular shaped, nebulosity.

Left: Original Ha 21x1800s master image.                Right: Confirmation image by APizzetti, TLekatsas & CSasse.                                                                                     

See the faint arcs above and below the main nebula, as well as the “central” thicker, more circular shaped, nebulosity.

With the advent of the space satellite Gaia and the publication of a new database containing 1.7 billion stars, it may seem that the window for discovery for amateur astronomers is shrinking to zero. Not so! Josep Drudis, a passionate imager and affiliate of iTelescope, recently did something unorthodox when he was pointing his telescope at the reflection nebula IC 2220 in the constellation Carina, usually known as the Toby Jug Nebula. In addition to the usual color filters he added Hydrogen Alpha to capture some of the "hot emission from the red giant in a cold reflection nebula. And then it took the curious eyes of his 10 year old daughter Anna, who was playing with the DDP lever of an image processing software (ooops, what did you play with at the age of 10?) and to point out some faint details in the image. He thus called it Anna's nebula

So what is the Science behind this? Reflection nebula are typically blue, think of the Pleiades reflection nebula that many of you have already imaged. The Toby Jug Nebula is different -  it is a red-orange reflection nebulae where the colors are caused by a red giant star (HR 3126). The resulting spectrum of this nebula is a blue touch to orange red.
 

You can find the interview here

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About Josep

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Josep Maria Drudis holds a Master of Science in Chemistry(1975) and a PhD in Chemistry (Organic Synthesis, 1980) by the Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona and a Master of Science in Astronomy by the Swinburne Technology University (2004, Melbourne), currently lives in Philadelphia, USA since July 2014. He is 66 years old and retired from professional life. He formerly worked as R&D Manager in two chemical industries and more than 25 years as CEO in different companies, including a big hospital, until his retirement. He currently devotes all of his free time to astrophotography, being a member of the Agrupación Astronómica de Sabadell (AAS, 1000 members). He has his own web site, and has received several awards: five APODs (NASA), seven AAPODs (Amateur APOD), more than twenty of his pictures have been published in books or magazines of the AAS. He publishes, every month, an article on Astrophotography in Astrum, the magazine of the AAS. A recent image of the Giant Shell Clouds of the Large Magellanic Cloud taken jointly with Don Goldman, was published in the Astronomy Magazine in February 2018. Recently, he discovered an, as yet, undetected nebula around IC 2220. A Research Note with this discovery has been recently published (American Astronomical Society).